The power of positivity, of space and of images

A few weeks back I went to London for a celebratory luncheon with my fellow KM Cookbook coauthors, Chris Collison and Patricia Eng. I got the 09.24 from Eastbourne to London Victoria. As usual it was composed of just 4 coaches. At Lewes, boarding passengers were made to stand for the next 60 minutes despite an additional 4 coaches coupling up enroute at Haywards Heath. At Gatwick 1st class is decommissioned but still there is not a seat to be had.

It’s the same every day: the “On Board Supervisor” (OBS) apologises for overcrowding noting that 1st class passengers can claim a refund and the passengers fulminate about the half arsed way the railway is run.

However my 16th May journey was notable for a very different reason, the banter provided by “Driver Steve Copley“. From his welcome and throughout the 90 minute journey Steve kept up a regular litany of anecdotes, poetry and humour. At first my reaction was one of irritation. When I took a time out (and gave myself permission) to really listen I began to appreciate how clever and varied his oratory was. At Gatwick (where there was a delay) Steve greeted onboarding passengers in 5 languages and recited a poem as a way of apologising for the delay caused by a malfunctioning toilet.

Intending to change at East Croydon I felt compelled to stay aboard to see what he’d say about Britain’s busiest station, Clapham Junction, and how he’d mark the end of the journey.  Steve didn’t let me down: Clapham is the place where you change for all stations beginning with the letter S – he listed a number – and for those who want to avoid the hustle of the capital!  Victoria, named after a past Queen, is where you alight to see the home of the current one.

At Victoria I sought him out – there was a queue of people doing the same, thanking him for making their by now delayed journey such a pleasure.

It was notable that people had smiles on their faces, they talked to each other and in one case the young lad next to me made conversation with a lady across the aisle who had taught him for just one term some 3 years before. Steve’s rhetoric had created an environment where barriers were lowered and people felt comfortable conversing.

It took me back a few weeks to a couple of experiences in Hong Kong and Kuala Lumpur.

Space

I was in Kuala Lumpur to run a Masterclass (my fourth) at the International Islamic University of Malaysia and to give the keynote address at the second KM Exchange held at the Securities Commission’s lovely offices.

Keynote in KL

Well attended, the KM exchange was very well run (as you’d expect from an event Straits Knowledge are involved in) with the tables arranged cocktail style with plenty of interactive time built into the agenda.

The speakers were part of and came from the audience. It encouraged the collaboration that occured.

Getting among the delegates

It contrasted to the KM Asia event in Hong Kong the week after which was less well attended and where the speakers occupied the front tables and the delegates the rear creating an “us and them” feel.  It meant the only way to get engagement in a society where deference trumps demonstrative was to leave the stage and be among them.

While in Asia I wrote a longer article for Business Information Review on collaborative knowledge spaces which will appear in the June edition. In it I will draw on my experiences to demonstrate the importance of set up to running any event. Keep a look out for it.

And finally: when you look at things differently, the things you look at change

I spent last Saturday morning helping Bees Homes Managing Partner, Ana to stage a property ahead of its listing for sale. Previously on the market with another agent and empty it had failed to attract sufficient interest.

Here’s the same room as seen through the lens of two different agents:

As presented by Agent 1

As presented by Bees Homes

 

 

 

 

 

And this is what a prospective buyer (who previously saw it online but did not pursue it further) said when he contacted us for a viewing:

“Have they had work done, it looks so different now and really nice?”

Each of the above examples illustrate the importance of presentation and empathy. You need to get in the shoes of people (buyers/delegates/passengers) if you are going to connect with them. And to do that you need to create the right enviroment.

 

Collaborative Knowledge Space: Asian reflections & beyond

International Islamic University of Malaysia Kuala Lumpur

I’ve been back a couple of weeks since the Masterclass I ran at the International Islamic University of Malaysia.in Kuala Lumpur.

Today I received some of the photos of the event so figured now is a good time to reflect and provide an update on the survey analysis and the timing of the report I promised to write.

It’s also a good time to remind Eileen Tan from Asia and Ciaran Joyce from Europe that they have not yet given me their addresses so I can send them “Navigating the Minefield: A Practical KM Companion” which is being printed as I write this.

survey report:

Last week I met with Professor Clive Holtham and Ningy (Jonny) Jiang at Cass Business School to review some of the responses.  We are now working on a report and paper to appear in May when I will share some of the findings at the 10th Anniversary Celebrations of NetIKX.

survey analysis in KL

Among a number of practical exercises the KL masterclass group undertook throughout the day was to look at the questions and 120 responses and decide which they thought most compelling.

One group chose Question 7: “What do you understand by the term digital workspace?”

They were asked to share their findings with the rest of the group which made for a very interesting discussion. Alongside is what they chose.

This one also stood out:

My office has all the things I need to work, computer (obviously), tools, my old notebooks, reference documents, books, address book/name card
case, telephone, toys, post it notes with reminders. Scrunch that all up and make it available anywhere and anytime via the internet and an interface.

What I found interesting: there were more definitions than you could throw a stick at!

What was also revealing from Question 2 Where do you have your most interesting work conversations: informal space is really important but there is no ‘one size fits all’ approach that will work since people are people and have different styles and ways of working.

masterclass takeaways:

The takeaway session

I was particularly delighted by the delegates response when I asked them to list 3 things / learning’s they would take away from the Masterclass.

Here’s what they said:

A conducive collaboration workspace can encourage innovation

Increase collaborative hub / breakout spaces

(I must) Go out of my room and meet more people

Technology is critical for virtual collaboration

(An understanding of) The digital space success factors

Mind shift is important to make change work in an organisation

Ask specific questions to area experts

Issues on establishing digital space including the importance of establishing it in promoting collaboration and knowledge sharing

The kind of approaches to establishing digital space.

How to create effective virtual team space and collaborative space

(An understanding of) The drivers for knowledge space

Understanding on the concept of an effective knowledge space design for collaboration and innovation

Space matters, either physical, digital or neutral and we are dealing with people.

Methods of sharing:

·       Postcards to the future

·       “let’s go for a walk”

·       Memory page to explain experience

How to make collaborative space work:

·       Conducive space (online/face to face)

·       The hybrid of both is important

Know the culture to avoid culture barriers and communication breakdown.

Virtual collaboration can only be effective if it is properly planned, everyone provided full training risks clearly identified.

A conducive collaborative workspace can encourage innovation.

Technology is critical for virtual collaboration.

Knowledge sharing can improve productivity.

It is important to know how to create the environment to encourage knowledge sharing.

Knowledge sharing and collaboration can happen anywhere, any time, any device.

It felt like everyone went away having had a great day. I certainly enjoyed it and am already looking forward to returning in November while I am in Asia for KM Asia.

Paul and the Masterclass delegates